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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
will make the environment better. we had approximately 1,000 overflows occur in 1999. today, we've reduced overflows by 45% to 50%. and it's going to continue to improve as we go forward with the rehabilitation program that's required under the consent decree. narrator: an important piece of the program is the construction of an 8-mile-long storage tank that will significantly decrease combined sewer overflows. man: right now, we're at the bottom of the rockdale construction shaft. we're 310 feet below grade, deep under atlanta in hard rock. in the downtown area of atlanta, the sewer system and the stormwater system are combined and there are overflows during storm events, and so the purpose of this system is to relieve that flow, take it into the tunnel, transport it to a brand-new treatment plant, clean up the chattahoochee river. narrator: instead of the combined sewage overflowing into the river, it will flow into this tunnel that acts as a storage tank. the water will then slowly empty into the new plant for treatment before it's released back into the river. man: the system in total
the state plan to save money and help the environment. details straight ahead on this monday morning. good morning, and thanks so much for joining us i hope awed great weekend i am megan pringle. charley crowson is off but lynette charles is here. >> it's a dry start. and we will start to have change in the forecast. we start off with maryland's most powerful radar as of now 679 but -- now. but you will have change later into the evening and overnight tomorrow. and we will talk about another wentry mix. take advantage of this morning. as we check out temperatures let's switch over to another source and see what's going on this morning because we will deal with the fact that temperatures are going to be coming in very cold this morning. # 2 degrees and we are talking about temperature wise as it goes throughout the day and temperatures very cold going into the afternoon. be prepared for that and we are also going to be dealing with coming in tomorrow afternoonthings will switch back over to rain. i will detail more of that coming up. let's check the traffic with lauren cook. >> reporter: go
bringing investigative reporting to the civil-rights story and the other is the fbi environment, killing, the meridian bombing, the attempted set up by the fbi that led to the arrest of tommy terence, murder in athens. tell me if you would the impact having that kind of news coverage on the movement had on sort of the national understanding of what was going on. >> we really understood the press as educational tv. everything that had been going on that we were involved in had been going on for 100 years. it was hard to get it out. because this is 1963, i was reminded that fred shuttlesworking to get martin luther king on the seventeenth of december to promise he would come to birmingham this year but that is because on the fourteenth or fifteenth fred's church had been bombed for the third time in 1962. there had been 16 bombings of homes that receive no publicity. fred shuttlesworth was quite frank that he needed martin luther king to come over there to give intention to this in just this. one of my other good friends, a guy who had been with us in the movement from camera man, was quit
to texas. last week in a radio ad governor perry said texas offers a friendlier business environment than california. >>> 7:48. tomorrow night, president obama will deliver his first state of the union address of his second term. jamie dupree joins us via skype. what are you hearing about the focus of the president's state of the union address? >> reporter: the basic line out of officials from the white house the last couple of days has been that the president will focus on economic issues, job and the economy, still at the top of the list. but, of course, i would think, tori, that he will talk about a number of very detailed items like the ideas of gun and gun violence in the wake of the newtown, connecticut shootings, immigration reform issues and the budget cuts coming up on march -- march 1,the focus -- the -- march 1st. the focus the white house is saying the argument will be on economic issues. we'll see what happens tomorrow night. >> do you expect he will set a more conciliatory tone with republicans or will he still have that aggression tone at the inauguration address? >> report
perry says texas offers a friendlier business environment than california. >>> president obama will deliver his state of the union address. white house says the main theme will be so-called pocketbook issues. policies to help the middle class. last week the president gave house democrats a preview of what he will say. >> i'm going to be talking about making sure that we are focused on job creation in the united states of america. >> the white house says after the state of the union address, president obama will travel to three different communities explaning the proposals in his speech. the president will go to ashville, north carolina on wednesday. atlanta, georgia on thursday. and chicago on friday. >>> tracy police are asking for the public's help to find the driver involved in a fatal hit and run. a bicyclist was hit and killed in a crash last wednesday on shulty road. police are looking for a dark can alreadied late '90s model sedan. anyone with information on the drivers identity or car is asked to contact tracy police. >>> time now 5:47. gun owners stocked up on ammo at
environment. it doesn't determine that you're going to be a failure. the gun violence, regardless of how many laws are passed, it's up to the people to unite to build stronger bridges of communication, to make a difference in the commy.
. it may allow people to detect light and dark in the environment. the blind can see something again. >> one of the things i can do now is laundry. my husband had to put the colored clothes all together in a pile. with the glasses, i'm able to do that myself. >> reporter: kathy blake is 61 and has been blind for 23 years. but after a two-hour surgery, kathy has a new perspective. >> the glasses really help me be more outdoors, with mobility, walking. >> reporter: right now, the device is only approved for retinitis p retinitis pigmentosa. complete vision loss. only about 100,000 people in the u.s. suffer from it. the device could be used to treat millions who can't see. >> i think that the future for this is going to be big. >> reporter: let's hope. and if you're wondering what sparked the doctor's interest in blindness? it turns out, his grandmother went blind. so, he devoted his entire career to finding a cure for this. >> how rewarding for him. >> thanks, gio. >>> coming up on the broadcast, the big question for "star wars" geeks. is harrison ford going to go solo one more time? k
out of business. deb? >> saving the environment and trying to rejolt the economy. all right. chris lawrence, thanks for us there in washington, d.c. appreciate it. >>> a mother flying to atlanta tries to soothe her crying child. that's when police say a fellow passenger actually slapped the boy and yelled out a racial slur. parents describe the traumatic incident just ahead. >>> mixed martial arts, a sport that's exploding in popularity in the u.s. going to tell you why. >>> also, remarkable guide dogs, trained by a woman whose hollywood pedestrian grill is very well known. we will talk live to entertainer lauren aluft, daughter of judy garland. copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva helps control my copd symptoms by keeping my airways open for 24 hours. plus, it reduces copd flare-ups. spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled copd maintenance treatment that does both. spiriva handihaler tiotropium bromide inhalation powder does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. tell your doctor if you have kidney problems, glaucoma, trouble urinating, or an enlar
in the environment. essentially, the blind can see something, again. >> one of the things i can do now is laundry. my husband had to put the colored clothes together in a pile and with the glasses i can do that myself. >> reporter: cathy blake is 61. and has been blind for 23 years, but after a two-hour search, she has a new perspective. >> the glasses really help me be more outdoors with mobility, walking. >> reporter: right now the device is only approved for retinitis pigmentosa. a rare genetic disease that causes complete vision loss. only 100,000 people in the u.s. suffer from it. the hope is the device can be used to treat millions who can't see. >> i really think the future for this is going to be big. >> that really is incredible. and it did not come cheap at all, $100 million in public money and $100 million in private money to get to that technology. >> two clinical trials, 20 years of trying this. and this is the kind of story you always hear about some kind of development to help people who don't have an arm or leg, but sight is one of the most precious things that we have. to be able to
dislocation that could be catastrophic. i don't care whether you are talking the environment, economy, education, health, the prison system, the justice system. we have a large number, the ngo movement, non-governmental organization, public interest movement is wide and diverse but don't relate to this 50 years ago. what it doesn't have is a cohesive sense that they are working on related problems that ought to create a sense of movement that we are indebted to our history if our history were more accurate. i think history is about the future and the future is -- if the future is dangerous, then it will be less dangerous and more hopeful with a better sense we have of our history. but i am a historian. i guess you could expect me to say that. i am trying to put it in a different way. >> i want to thank you for the wonderful work you are doing. i have grandchildren i definitely want to share it with. my question is about another age group. as i look around this room, i see a number of white males of a certain age who probably lived through much of the times you are talking about at som
go into that environment where everyone else is not maybe lined up with the way you believe and the way you think, after, you know, time, you could -- the stress could probably wear on you. i don't think it's in any way justifiable, someone going out and killing anyone because they're stressed out at work. there are ways and outlets of releasing stress. chris unfortunately was one of those people he bottled up a lot of his emotions and wasn't very good at expressing himself. >> he didn't have close friends? he didn't talk to his mom? >> i believe he did have a good relationship with his mother and some of his close friends, but even, i think, in the manifesto he lists how he just sort of alienated himself from everyone towards the end. >> did he think he was better than everyone else? that manifesto is so narcissistic, isn't it? >> completely. everything is i was always the best and somehow i was done wrong. >> i mentioned that yesterday. one time i think maybe sort of as a light note -- i kind of have to laugh about something in this or else it makes you a little crazy in y
of 43% trust republicans with gun policy. on the issue of the environment, 55% trust president obama more. foreign policy, it is 51% to 37%. theresa, nevada. caller: regarding president obama using executive orders to go around the republicans in the house, i am all for it. i am aware that this is a two- party democracy and we need republicans to be reasonable working party, but they have not been. the president has no choice but to go around them. john boehner has walked away. i am frustrated and the country is frustrated, other democrats are frustrated and scared. i am scared of the things they're willing to do to our country. he is doing what he has to do. i am all for his proposals, all for clean energy and comprehensive immigration, i am for gun legislation. i am for all of them. i am center-left, that is progressive. i think the country is definitely going progressive. i do not understand where the republicans want to obstruct and go with their small mindedness and small government proposals that they think that they can push through on the american people that i do not think a
with the political environment that he came out of and i think that, you know, it's giving me a little bit more insight going back with these folks for quite a long period of time. although they don't all like what i put in the book about them. >> talk about your kids. are you a tough dad? >> i'm not a tough dad. they tend to run roughshod over me a fair amount of time. they do it in a generally respectful way. i think i'm now getting out of the eyeball roll years where they react that way to me. i'm moving to a better place with them which is good. >> this is hysterical. the eyeball roll years. i'm in those. take me to the take your kids to workday with mikhail gorbechev. >> it was ten years ago when mikhail was in new york. i had an interview scheduled with him. i brought them to meet gorbechev. they sat through the interview. the picture came out and a friend said that is from the wax museum? i said no. that is gorbechev. >> his book, "the center holds" will be in bookstores in may. >>> next weekend, my interview with former new york mayor david dinkins. >>> then the oscar winning actor fals
in a hallow army. today the global environment is the most uncertain i have seen in the 36 years of service. it's unpredictable and dynamic. we simply don't know when we have to deploy soldiers to fight again. but history tells us that we will. we owe it to them, to ensure they have the proper resources to be ready when needed. the fiscal outlook which the u.s. army faces in fiscal year '13 is dire and to my knowledge unprecedented. in addition to the $180 billion. the combination of the continuing resolution a shortfall -- excuse me, the shortfall in oversays contingency operation funds for afghanistan and the sequester and fiscal year 2013 has resulted in a 17 to $18 billion shortfall to the army's operation and maintenance accounts. as well as an additional $6 billion to other programs. all of this will come in remaining seven months of this year. the fiscal year 2013 fiscal situation -- impact on all forces not serving in afghanistan or forward in korea. impacts which will have a significant impact to fiscal year 2014 and beyond. just a few of the acts we will be forced to take, are for
is greatly broadly enabling environment, and have a portfolio approach in investments, in research and development. i think the are a number of things that come setting aside the right technology, i think there's a number of things that are attractive about the idea of making it easier for entrepreneurs to start their own businesses. >> i think that plays to a core strength. so anything that we can reduce the time and cost with developing new products and reducing the capital requirements i think is going to be a win for the training. >> one thing that you mentioned was materials. this may be lower on your list. last week, europe just announced they were funding to the tune of 1 billion euros in research into crafting. if you haven't heard about it, it's worth looking at. it's the carbon structure that is stronger than steel and more productive than copper and has lots of bendable, lots of very intuitive and industrial applications in your phone, and computers and things like that. and so we've just seen europe collectively make a big bet on research into wrangling with it and try
and it was -- not necessarily a safe environment to walk in. we went there and just took a quick look to see if we can quickly determine what the cause was or get an idea. we were really weren't able to from what we saw yesterday. we just need to get some lighting in there. that's what they're doing today is moving it to the shipyard so we can get lighting and operate safely within the engine room space. >> reporter: patrick says whatever happened, that fire flashed like that, seen on a television monitor, they also point out that it appears the fire was not that big, but it was in exactly the wrong place and might have taken out a major circuit or major wire, which is why that little fire took out the power to an entire huge ship. they do have block back boxes o vessel. the investigation takes 8 to 12 months. >> that's a long time. so the investigation begins as does the cleaning. martin savidge in mobile, thank you. >>> any minute, president obama addressing gun violence in his hometown of chicago. we'll take you there live. ♪ [ acoustic guitar: upbeat ] [ dog ] we found it together. on a walk, walk, walk
the partisan thing, and to build those coalitions out of the middle and very hard in this toxic environment. >> and also, coming up, a growing epidemic for the nation's youth, adder roall addiction and why a misdiagnosis can be fatal. we will talk to a columnist ellen schwartz, about the deadly case of one young man. and we will talk to stephanie cutter and also latino fellow from the university of texas, dr. francesco soto, but first, here is bill karins with the weather forecast. >> connecticut is not a fun place to be after the heels of the big blizzard and now dealing with freezing rain. one of the busiest highways i-95 has a overturned tractor-trailer and car on it, and that the idea of not traveling in massachusetts or connecticut, and just wait another couple of hours, because it will warm up and be rain. but right now, freezing rain is widespread in southern new england, and temperatures are warming up. new haven at 36 and providence 37 and so plenty of cold air for that freezing rain and snow and sleet there in massachusetts and new hampshire. we had the tornado yesterday, and it t
pushed to ban styrofoam in manhattan. >> it's not just terrible for the environment. it's another thing that's terrible for the taxpayers. styrofoam increases the cost of recycling by as much as $20 per ton because it has to be removed, something we know is environmentally destructive that is costing taxpayers money and that is easily replaceable, i think is something we can do without. >> joining me michael barbareau covers mayor bloomberg for "the no, times." good to see you. >> good to be here. >> he wants to take styrofoam out of new york city stores and restaurants. how feetible is th ibfeasible i? >> entirely feasible. this is like the cockroach of trash. >> the cockroach of trash. >> it never dies, it doesn't biodegrade, it breaks apart, ends up in the water system, being 20,000 tons of it in the city's landfills and he thinks it's unnecessary. >> and we think this is something that he can get done before he leaves office? >> yes. he's had a little more difficulty with banning other things like a 32-ounce soda but this one it appears can he get done through the city council which
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)